Hidden treasures

The cloister of Venice Patriarchal Seminary

Unknown places & works
seminario_patriarcale

The cloister of Venice Patriarchal Seminary

The palace located next to the wonderful Salute Basilica on the Grand Canal houses Venice Patriarchal Seminary, designed by famous Italian architect Baldassarre Longhena in 1669 to host the monastery of the Somascan Fathers.

In 1810, after the suppression of all religious congregations ordered by Napoleon, the building became a State property and the Patriarchal Seminary was moved there in 1818.

From then on, Canon Giannantonio Moschini started to collect not only gravestone and epigraph fragments coming from the churches that were demolished or suppressed in those years, but also many archaeological pieces of different origins.

This is how the cloister of the former monastery became an incredible open-air museum, where Venetian history is told by its stones.

For example, there is a Roman sepulchral altar (probably coming from Altino), which was then modified to add a ship with the Crusades sail; Roman milestones found in the Belltower foundations of San Pietro di Castello, the ancient cathedral of Venice; the tombstones of old knights and dignitaries of the Venice Republic within Gothic frames; the headstone of famous 16th – century scholar Tommaso Rangone, the astrologist who forecast a new deluge in 1524 and wrote a manual with tips to live up to 120 years; the Renaissance statue of St. Marina, which decorated the main altar of the church dedicated to the same saint and was annually visited by the Doge before being turned into a hostaria and finally destroyed, etc.

The cloister of Venice Patriarchal Seminary can be visited every day together with the magnificent Manfrediana Art Gallery.

If you found this post interesting and would like to discover other extraordinary unusual places of Venice, the editor of this popular section will organise a tailor-made itinerary just for you!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

Latest posts

Venice: The Royal Gardens of Venice are returning to life

giardini-reali
Unknown places & works

Venice never fails to amaze. After the disastrous high tide last November, the city shows its strong pride with the reopening, after ex...

View

Treviso: The curious legends about the origin of Treviso Red Chicory

radicchio_CC.Mon CEil
Did you know that...

Did you know that, according to an ancient popular saying, red chicory (radicchio as it is known in Italy) seems to have been born as a...

View

Venice: Acqua Alta: when a normal phenomenon becomes tragic

Acqua-alta-a-Venezia
Did you know that...

Did you know that ‘Acqua Alta’ is an expression of Venetian dialect used by its inhabitants to describe the high tides that occur p...

View

Venice: Mars, Adam and Eve: the Doge's Palace celebrates their return

restauro-adamo-eva-ducale
Unknown places & works

After four years of delicate restoration work, the three fifteenth-century statues by the great artist Antonio Rizzo will be exceptiona...

View

Top posts

Chioggia: The Valley of the Seven Dead Men

casone-millecampi-detto-casone-dei-sette-morti
Mysteries & Legends

Halloween is just around the corner: have you already got into the fascinating terrifying aura of the scariest party of the year? No ye...

View

Venice: The stone heart of St Mark’s Basilica

cuore-erizzo
Unknown places & works

If you are visiting St Mark’s Basilica and have just abandoned the wonderful vision of the Pala d'Oro (which is a must-see), just a f...

View

Venice: Map of Venice, what to know before you leave

mappa-venezia
Did you know that...

Did you know that Venice is not a single large island but rather a collection of 117 small islands linked together by over 400 bridges?...

View

Verona: The roman walls of Verona

porta-borsari
Historical Curiosities

Verona has always been considered a city of considerable importance from a military point of view: being at the mouth of the Adige Vall...

View