Hidden treasures

The door of the Tolentini Convent in Venice designed by Carlo Scarpa

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iuav-tolentini

The door of the Tolentini Convent in Venice designed by Carlo Scarpa

Near Piazzale Roma is the impressive Tolentini church, built by Vincenzo Scamozzi in the 16th century and finished with an elegant Greek-temple facade by Andrea Tirali in the early 1700s.

The adjacent convent was suppressed by the Napoleonic decree and became, as often happened in that period, a barracks. After being used as a place of shelter for the displaced of the River Po flood in 1951, in 1960 the State Property Office gave it to the University Institute of Architecture (IUAV).

Restoration work in the complex took place between 1960 and 1965 under the direction of the architects Daniele Calabi and Guido Bacci, who kept many of the architectural components of the original structure: the cloister with its arcades, the first floor with cells on three sides and a rare example of the 16th century suspended passage, perhaps designed by Scamozzi, on the second floor.

In 1985, the entrance was transformed according to the design of Carlo Scarpa. The ancient arched doorway was removed, placed in a horizontal position at the entrance and used as a basin. In its place, Scarpa created an entirely futuristic structure, with a whole new concept and when you pass in front of the door, in Tolentini Square, you can see that the lintel on the right has no support...

In case you did not know, Carlo Scarpa left his mark on several structures in Venice, which have changed the appearance of some of the famous places of the city. The usual tourist itineraries concentrate only on the most famous locations of the city, often leaving out some 'interesting places' that are definitely worth a visit! Thanks to our private tours of Venice, with a local tourist guides and completely adaptable to your needs, you will discover the city from a different perspective!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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