Hidden treasures

The Giusti Garden and Goethe’s cypress

Unknown places & works
giardino-giusti

The Giusti Garden and Goethe’s cypress

It is no coincidence that Italy has been dubbed 'the land of gardens' .... Every town, village or hamlet has a garden, perhaps with a centuries-old history in which nature’s wonders blend in with historical and artistic ones.

These gardens never cease to fascinate ... Visitors from all over the world come to admire them, but already in the past it was here that illustrious travelers were headed to.

In Verona, for example, there is the beautiful Giusti Garden, created in the late 1300s. Its present-day structure dates back to 1570 and was planned Agostino Giusti, a Knight of the Venetian Republic and Courtier of the Grand Duke of Tuscany.

In 1786, Wolfang Goethe visited it and was fascinated by a cypress over than six hundred years old that he majestically described in his 1817 'Journey to Italy'.

The garden can be divided into various areas: the most important are the western one and the oriental one.

In the first one there are four quadrangular flower beds, flanked by a tree-lined avenue. In the first square there is a pool with a fountain where dolphins are carved; in the second a pagan statue representing Minerva; in the third there is a statue of Apollo while in the fourth square, it is possible to admire one of the most important statues of the park.

In the second area, the eastern one, there are only two squares, mirroring those of the western zone. In the first square, divided into four triangular beds, a small fountain in red Verona marble stands in the center; the second one is famous for the labyrinth of hedges, one of the few still present in Veneto, redesigned by Luigi Trezza in 1786.

The Giusti Garden is just one of the many attractions that the city of Romeo and Juliet offers its visitors ... Find out how to best visit them with our tours and activities in Verona!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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