Hidden treasures

The Mario Rimoldi Museum of Modern Art in Cortina d'Ampezzo

Unknown places & works
museo-rimoldi

The Mario Rimoldi Museum of Modern Art in Cortina d'Ampezzo

When we talk about this 'Pearl of the Dolomites' we usually think of ski slopes, luxury hotels and shopping in the glittering boutiques of the old town.

But Cortina actually has much more to offer! Not everyone knows that this town has one of the most beautiful museums of modern Italian art of the early twentieth century: the Mario Rimoldi museum.

The Museum was inaugurated in 1974, following the conspicuous donation of Rosa Braun, widow of Mario Rimoldi, a famous collector of Cortina d'Ampezzo, who was a friend of artists of the likes of de Pisis, De Chirico, Sironi, Campigli and Music, all regulars in Cortina.

In 1941, when the first International Exhibition of Collectors opened in Cortina, Mario Rimoldi's collection had already been outlined: the wonderful works of de Pisis, Morandi, Semeghini, Rosai, Campigli, Sironi, Garbari, Severini, Tosi and Guidi stand out.

In the post-war period the experimental works of artists already represented with figurative paintings also became part of the collection. Rimoldi was interested in artists linked to the figurative vein and to the Veneto area such as Cadorin, Cesetti, Saetti, Tomea and Depero, with a penchant also for new movements that were emerging outside the Veneto region. The collection was enriched with La Zolfara by Guttuso and other works by the protagonists of the new experimentation period such as Corpora, Crippa, Dova, Morlotti, Music, Santomaso, Vedova. He also discovered foreign artists such as Kokoschka, Leger, Villon, Zadkine, and approached the protagonists of the new avant-gard and the abstract works of the Fifties.

Take advantage of our Cortina and Dolomiti excursion from Venice to reach without hassle this famous mountain resort! The Museum of Modern Art is open every day, except Monday, from 10.30 to 12.30 and from 16.00 to 20.00.

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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