Hidden treasures

The roman walls of Verona

Historical Curiosities
porta-borsari

The roman walls of Verona

Verona has always been considered a city of considerable importance from a military point of view: being at the mouth of the Adige Valley and at the crossroads of the Postumia, Gallica and Claudio-Augusta Roman roads, it had to implement appropriate defense systems.

A first section of defensive walls was built by the ancient Romans in the 1st century BC entrenching only the southern part of the city because in the north, west and east, the River Adige provided a natural protection. From the second century BC, Verona took on a fundamental strategic role in the administration of Roman Italy, so from a military camp, the city of Verona became a thriving trading center. The actual city walls, according to the most recent historical sources, date back to the late Republican era: 900 meters long, they were built in alternating layers of large pebbles cemented with mortar and bricks. In 265 AD, due to the threat given by the Alemanni, the emperor Gallienus decided to carry out a great restoration project of the walls, whose conservation, after almost two centuries of peace, was in a very bad state. This led to the construction of the ‘Walls of Gallienus’ which included the wall that surrounded the Arena and perhaps, given that the attribution to the emperor is dubious, the section of walls that runs from Porta Iovia (now known as Porta Borsari) to Porta Leona. The threat posed by the Barbarians was so pressing that the walls were restored in just six months using any material which could be found locally such as fragments of buildings, headstones and tombs.

In the following centuries the walls of Verona kept being modified, renovated and restored... a long and exciting history that we can still read today among the remains found inside the city of Verona. City palaces, squares and evocative alleyways hide real treasures of Roman history that must be seen! With our‘Guided tour of Underground Verona: discovering the hidden places of the Scaliger city’ you will be accompanied to the discovery of extraordinary archaeological sites in the most secret places of the city!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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